7 tips to help you start that college conversation

For the last few days, we’ve been offering some advice for parents of college-bound students, which is available from the Complete Survival Guide for Parents   from the Student Advisor Blog.

 Today, we talk about having “that talk” with your children. No, not the birds and the bees talk. No, not the talk about drugs. But the talk about college. Beth Fredericks offers seven easy steps to starting the conversation about college.

  1. Start early
    It’s never too early to start talking to your children about college.
  2. Point out colleges
    Show them. Don’t tell them. So, if there is a college nearby, point it out to them. Attend an event on campus. Young people can get inspired about attending college by actually being on campus at an event.
  3. Start the talk before ninth grade
    It’s important to tell your son or daughter at the start of ninth grade that what he/she does from ninth grade on will count.
  4. Enlist allies
    You already know that young people don’t always listen to what their parents say. So, don’t be afraid to get some help from other adults – aunts, uncles, their friends’ parents they look up to – to help spread the word.
  5. Get serious about sophomores
    Second-year students are starting to get serious with their academic choices. Encourage them to take a leadership role in school and in the community.
  6. Get active in fall of junior year
    Your son or daughter is now halfway through high school. It’s time to get serious. Encourage your son or daughter to take a virtual college tour or plan a trip to visit campuses. 
  7. Discuss the financial issues
    Your son or daughter needs to know how his/her education is going to be financed so that the appropriate decisions – live on campus or at home – can be made.

If you’ve already been through this and have additional suggestions please let us know.

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